La Mancha and the Heart of a Teacher

When I think back to my days in the classroom the most important moments happened when I looked past the hardened sneer of a difficult student to see them as they really were. They were never what they seemed on the surface. Somewhere deep inside them there was something more. Of course, this inner spirit was often walled off and starved; and the more a student needed my help, the more they pushed me away. The one’s who needed love the most always seemed hardest to love. There were many, many days I lost sight of my students as people. I gave in and saw them as they wanted to be seen and not as they truly were.

I believe it is essential for teachers to have the heart of ‘Don Quixote’, the Man of La Mancha. Don Quixote sees the beauty in life; and he sees the inner beauty of the people around him including Aldonza, a hard hearted and angry whore. Quixote sees her as Dulcinea, a virtuous lady, and treats her as such. Aldonza rejects Quixote’s vision of her. She insists she is nothing. She can deal with anger but not with tenderness.

Quixote’s response? “Never deny that you are Dulcinea!”

I wish every teacher could see the best that lies hidden in their students. I wish every teacher would  do their best to bring that ‘best’ to the surface.

The classroom is a complex organism. It is composed of many, many unique individuals, each with their own set of experiences, each on a journey to find their place in the world. It’s easy to lose the heart of Don Quixote and to simply deal with the world as we see it. Near the end of his life even the Man of La Mancha lost faith in his own quest to see others as their best selves.

In fact, it is Aldonza, the most hardened of souls, that finally begins to see herself as Quixote has seen her. She feels the good soul within her. It is Aldonza, the student, who revives Quixote, the teacher, from his despair.

Don Quixote has touched the soul of Aldonza. She will never be the same. No longer a whore. She is Dulcinea, the lady.

May the heart of La Mancha burn in the heart of every teacher. May we open our eyes to the Dulcinea’s and the Quixote’s that enter our classrooms every day. May we help them see the goodness within them.

pete

4 Responses to La Mancha and the Heart of a Teacher

  1. rip says:

    I’ve always loved “The Man of La Mancha” – thanks for drawing this parallel between Don Quixote and teachers. Of course the great man is slightly mad … but his optimism is admirable. ;-)

  2. Michael says:

    Pete,
    Bravo – your talent to weave a story and inspire is wonderful.
    Michael

  3. Pete Reilly says:

    Michael,
    Thanks for the kind words. A little positive feedback goes a long way. Like watering a plant.
    pete

  4. […] La Mancha and the Heart of a Teacher (preilly.wordpress.com) Share this:FacebookLike this:LikeBe the first to like this post. This entry was posted in Autobiography, Remembrance of French past and tagged Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, Westerford High School. […]

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